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ENGL 113: Approaches to University Writing

Evaluating Sources for Credibility

Evaluating information is imperative before using it in your research papers or presentations. Be prepared to fact-check claims that you come across, and pay attention to where the information is coming from. Use the tips on this page to learn how to identify bias as well as how to evaluate news, journal articles and websites.

"Evaluating Sources for Credibility." North Carolina State University Libraries, published on YouTube 9 June  2015.

How to Evaluate Library Resources?

Books and database articles should be evaluated to determine their credibility and relevance to your topic before selecting them for a research assignment. Use the CRAAP test below to help you evaluate whether a source is right for your research. 

Use this CRAAP test worksheet to evaluate your sources. 

Currency

  • What is the publication date of the book or database article?
  • How up-to-date are the citations in the bibliography?
  • How current does the information need to be for your topic or your assignment?  

Relevancy

  • Does the information relate directly to your topic or answer your question?
  • Who is the audience for the publication (scholarly or general)?
  • Is the information primary or secondary in nature?
  • Does it provide general background information or in-depth information on a specific topic? Which do you need?

Authority

Who created the information?

  • What are the qualifications of the author, publisher, or organization responsible for the content of the resource?
  • What are the author's education and/or experience?
  • Look for the author's biography or information about the publisher or responsible organization  either within the publication or use the sources below to find out more about authors, publishers, and organizations:

Accuracy

  • Is the information supported by evidence?
  • Can you verify the information in another source?
  • How extensive is the bibliography or list of cited references? Can you use these references to find more information on your topic?
  • Are there spelling, grammar, or other typographical errors?

Purpose

  • What is the purpose of the information? Is it meant to inform you, sell you something or persuade you?
  • Does it present a fair and balanced view of an issue?
  • Are there political, ideological, cultural, religous, or personal biases?
  • Are opinions or propaganda easy to recognize?
  • Are there advertisements that suggest the information might be biased toward selling a product rather than providing objective information?
  • biased toward selling a product rather than providing objective information?