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CHS 202: Race, Racism and Critical Thinking

Race, Racism and Critical Thinking

How do bills become law?

 

Congress is composed of two houses, Senate and House of Representatives: There are four basic types of legislation that are handled by Congress. They include bills, simple resolutions, joint resolutions and concurrent resolutions. A bill is the most common type of legislation and can be either permanent or temporary. It may also be general or special in nature; public or private.

The Legislative Branch of the California State Government is composed of the State Assembly, the State Senate, and several other departments. This branch holds the principle lawmaking powers of the state. On average, the Legislature will propose, analyze, and debate over 6,000 bills in a single two-year session.

A bill is proposed legislation under consideration by a legislature. A bill does not become law until it is passed by the legislature and, in most cases, approved by the executive. Once a bill has been enacted into law, it is called an act of the legislature, or a statute.

An Act of Congress is a statute enacted by the United States Congress. It can either be a Public Law, relating to the general public, or a Private Law, relating to specific institutions or individuals

How a bill becomes a law at the federal level