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Anthropology

Find resources and conduct research in anthropology via the Oviatt Library.

Citing Sources

Anthropology

Visit the University Library's Research Strategies Citing Your Sources page for information on APA, and Chicago citation styles.

American Anthropology Association (AAA) citation style guide

The Online Writing Lab at Purdue offers Research and Citation Resources

Wondering whether to use author-date vs. notes-bibliography method if using Chicago style citation? Consult with your professor and also see:

Chicago Style Citation: Author Date vs. Note and Bibliography Long Island University Libguide

Chicago Style Citations and Format: Author Date vs. Note and Bibliography

Archaeology

Visit the University Library's Research Strategies Citing Your Sources page for information on APA, and Chicago citation styles.

American Anthropology Association (AAA) citation style guide

Society for American Archaeology (SAA) Style Guide

Biological Anthropology 

American Journal of Physical Anthropology citation style 

On the American Journal of Physical Anthropology journal webpage under the Author Guidelines scroll down to section 4: Preparing for submission, and look for "References" - it has referencing information for in text citations and bibliographies. As of 2017 the American journal of Physical Anthropology citation style is the same as APA 6th edition.

Visit the University Library's Research Strategies Citing Your Sources page for information on APA citation.

Citation Managers: How-To Guides and Tutorials

Upcoming Specialized Drop-In Workshops

CSUN librarians are offering a series of specialized workshops on a variety of topics. Visit our Library Research Zoom Workshops events page for information about Citation Manager Workshops and more.

Citation Managers: What Are They and Why Use Them?

Citation Managers are bibliographic management programs that will help you keep track of articles and books as you find them, organize your references and create bibliographies in 100s of citation styles (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago, Turabian, etc.)

They will also allow you to:

  • Import citations as you research from databases and catalogs
  • Save and organize citations
  • Attach PDFs of articles, when available
  • Embed citations (footnotes or in-text) into your word processing documents
  • Collaborate with others online
  • Discover the latest research

The most popular citation managers are EndNote and Zotero. Below are their differences. Remember to always check with your professor if you are not sure.

EndNote - Web version (EndNote Online or EndNote Basic) free to anyone; integrates with MS Word; the Instruction Labs at the Oviatt Library have the Cite-While-You-Write plug-in on Word for students to access their EndNote web accounts

Zotero - Free to anyone; integrates with MS Word and/or Google Docs; must be installed on your own computer 

Criteria Zotero EndNote and EndNote Web
Website http://www.zotero.org/

http://endnote.com/

EndNote Web: https://www.myendnoteweb.com/

Web based? Yes, works with Firefox browser and can sync with online account; connectors for Chrome and Safari available EndNote is a standalone app but it can transfer library to EndNote Web.
Operating System Windows, Mac, Linux Windows or MAC
Cost Free for basic account and the standalone app. Some cost for more online storage space Free for EndNote Web but $$ for the standalone app.
Import from databases Yes Direct export from specific databases
Import citation info from web pages Yes, also archives the page and you can add annotations only with EndNote Web bookmarklet
Attach associated files (PDFs, etc.) Yes, with option to attach automatically Yes, and can highlight and annotate PDFs

adapted from American University Library and Penn State University Libraries

Document Reader