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FCS 255: The Fashion Industry

Fashion design and fashion industry

Finding Demographic and Business Data for Local Area

Reference Books with Demographic Data in the University Library

Selective Books in the University Library

Books on Starting a Business

Use OneSearch to find additional books such as:

Citing Census Data From American Factfinder

Book

Ontiveros, R. J. (2014). In the spirit of a new people: The cultural politics of the Chicano movement. New York: New York University Press.
Ontiveros argues that the arts provide an expression of the Chicano movement that circumvents neoliberalism and connects historic struggles to current lived experience. Chicano artists have integrated environmentalism and feminism with the Chicano movement in print media, visual arts, theater, and novels since the 1970s. While focused on art, this book also provides a history of the coalition politics connecting the Chicano movement to other social justice struggles.

 

Journal article

Alvarez, N. & Mearns, J. (2014). The benefits of writing and performing in the spoken word poetry community. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 41(3), 263-268. doi:10.1016/j.aip.2014.03.004
Prior research has shown narrative writing to help with making meaning out of trauma. This article uses grounded theory to analyze semi-structured interviews with ten spoken word poets.  Because spoken word poetry is performed live, it creates personal and community connections that enhance the emotional development and resolution offered by the practice of writing. The findings are limited by the small, nonrandom sample (all the participants were from the same community).

Citing Census Data

Dynamically generated tables, maps, and files from American FactFinder:
(Use semicolons to separate elements)

  1. U.S. Census Bureau;
  2. Name of the database or other data repository/source (e.g., American FactFinder), set off by quotation marks, or follow publication citation style;
  3. The name of the person who generates the tabulation, etc., e.g., "generated by John Smith;"
  4. The name of the software package used to generate the tabulation, if known, e.g., "using American FactFinder;"
  5. The URL of the application software's main or first page set off by angle brackets, e.g., <http://factfinder2.census.gov>;
  6. The date, within parenthesis, when the user generated the tabulation, e.g., (7 January 2012).

 

For a reference map in American FactFinder:

 

For a thematic map in American FactFinder 
(Find the specific survey or census, data set and matrix number under the map image):

  • U.S. Census Bureau; Census 2000, Summary File 1, Matrix P7; generated by Joe Smith; using American FactFinder; <http://factfinder2.census.gov>; (15 February 2012).

Examples:

  • U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey, 2010 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, Table GCT0101; generated by John Smith; using American FactFinder; <http://factfinder2.census.gov>; (7 January 2012).
  • U.S. Census Bureau; Census 2000, Summary File 1, Table P001; generated by Jane Jones; using American FactFinder; <http://factfinder2.census.gov>; (20 February 2012)
  • U.S. Census Bureau; 2010 Census Summary File 1; Tables P1 and QT-P1; generated by John Smith; using American FactFinder; <http://factfinder2.census.gov>; (12 December 2011).

Citing Data from Others

Properly citing data assists in the research process by giving data creators proper credit for their work, aids replication, provides permanent and reliable information about the data source, helps track the impact of the data, and facilitates resource discovery and access.

Citing Data From Others

In many cases, a data provider will include recommended citation formats (i.e. the ICPSR). Also note that the producers of a particular dataset may request that users of the data cite a publication in which the data are described, rather than citing the dataset (i.e. the Database of Political Institutions). 

When a data provider does not recommend a citation format, we recommend these general citation guidelines:

  1. Author/Principal Investigator
  2. Year of Publication
  3. Title of the Data Source
  4. Edition/Version Number
  5. Format of the Data Source (e.g. [Computer File], [CD-ROM], [Online], etc.)
  6. Producer of the Data Source
  7. Distributor of the Data Source
  8. URL for the Data Source

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