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Journalism

Research resources for Journalism students

How To Find Journal Articles:

To see if the University Library subscribes to a journal, select the "journals" link under the OneSearch search box on the homepage. Enter the title of the journal.

To browse a list of the journals specific to journalism, enter "journalism" in the OneSearch search box. Select the "Advanced Search" link on the top right of the page. In the drop down menu under "searching for" select "subject." From the material type drop down menu, select "journals."

University Library Journalism Journals

University Library Communication Journals

University Library Broadcasting Journals

Find Articles by Subject and Database

Specialized Databases for Journalism Research

ABI/INFORM and ProQuest Business Databases

Access to almost 3000 full- text business journals, many full text newspapers/newsletters and company reports, from 1971 to present. Good for articles on organizational communication, public relations, media business, and related areas.

Academic Search Premier

Multi-disciplinary database provides full text for more than 4,600 journals, including full text for nearly 3,900 peer-reviewed titles.

Art Full Text (Wilson)

Covering 400 art publications, including those relevant to photojournalism and graphic design.

Communication and Mass Media Complete (EBSCOhost)

Indexes and abstracts over 600 journals and trade publications; includes full text for over 240 journals. Subjects covered include journalism, public relations, mass media, photojournalism, communication studies, speech, linguistics, communicative disorders, deaf studies, advertising, and related areas of interest to practitioners and educators in these fields.

Ethnic NewsWatch + Ethnic NewsWatch: A History (Proquest)

Provides a full-text collection of ethnic and minority press content from the U.S. and Canada offering additional viewpoints from those offered by the mainstream press. Includes scholarly journals and working papers, trade journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, dissertations, and grass-roots publications primarily from minority presses.

Film & Television Literature Index (EBSCOHost)

Indexes over 350 U.S. and international film and television periodicals, including popular magazines, scholarly journals, and trade publications.

Nexis Uni

(formerly known as LexisNexis Academic) Provides access to more than 15,000 full-text news, business, and legal publications. Includes news coverage in national and regional newspapers, wire services, broadcast transcripts, international news, and non-English language sources; detailed company information and financial performance measures; and access to Shepard's Citations service for federal and state court cases.

Proquest Global Newstream

Full text access to a large selection of national and international newspapers, news wires and news sources.

SAGE Journals

Full text access to over 460 journals in business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology and medicine.

Web of Science

Multidisciplinary database providing access to citations from more than 12,000 research journals worldwide. Includes the following citation databases: Arts & Humanities Citation Index; Science Citation Index Expanded; and Social Sciences Citation Index. Cited reference searching is available.

Additional News Databases 

Additional Databases 

Brainstorm Search Terms

  1. Once you have chosen a topic, write it down in the form of a question or brief statement:
    • What is the relationship between SAT scores and college success?
  2. Pull out the keywords and phrases that are most specific to your topic:
    • "SAT scores" and "college success"
  3. Take those keywords and phrases and brainstorm related terms, concepts or synonyms
    • SAT scores > "scholastic aptitude test" or "college admission test"
    • college > "university" or "higher education"
    • success > achievement
  4. Formulate a search strategy using boolean search, wildcards, phrases, etc.
    • (SAT OR "scholastic aptitude test") AND (college OR universit*) AND (succe* OR achieve*)

Boolean Operators

Boolean operators are words (or, and, not) used to connect search terms to expand or narrow a search within a database to locate relevant information.

It is helpful to diagram the effects of these operators:

women or females

women or females

Or retrieves records that contain anyof the search terms. It expands the search. Therefore, use "or" in between terms that have the same meaning (synonyms) or equal value to the search.

women and media

women and media

And retrieves records that contain all of the search terms. It narrows or limits the search. Therefore, use "and" in between terms that are required to make the search specific.

image not weight

Not eliminates records that contain a search term. It narrows or limits the search. Therefore, use "not" in front of a term to ensure that the search will not include that term. Warning: Some databases use "and not" instead of "not." Check the database help screen.

 

Truncation

Most databases allow for a symbol to be used at the end of a word to retrieve variant endings of that word. This is known as truncation.

Using truncation will broaden your search. For example,

bank* will retrieve: bank or banks or banking or banker or bankruptcy, etc.

Databases and Internet search engines use different symbols to truncate. In general, most of the Library's databases use the asterisk (*) ; however, the exclamation point (!) is used in LexisNexis. Check the database help screen to find the correct truncation symbol.

Be careful using truncation. Truncating after too few letters will retrieve terms that are not relevant. For example:

cat* will also retrieve cataclysm, catacomb, catalepsy, catalog, etc.

It's best to use the boolean operator "or" in these instances (cat or cats).

Access Databases from Off Campus

Only current CSUN students, faculty and staff can access our databases from off campus. To access the databases from off campus, click the name of the database. You will then see a screen asking you to log in, using your CSUN User ID and password (the same ID and password you use to log in to the portal).

For more information, see Accessing Library Resources from Off-Campus and the Library's Copyright Statement (in particular, the Appropriate Use of University Library's Electronic Resources section).