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Family and Consumer Sciences

APA Style Guides, 7th edition

This guide is a quick introduction to the American Psychological Association (APA) 7th Edition Style for citations, basic format, and sample annotated bibliography. Please be sure to consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association 7th edition and/or the APA Style website for additional details.

There is a print copy available  in Reserves (4th floor, east wing) for a two hour checkout.

Most Notable changes from APA 6th edition to 7th edition

  1. Publisher location is NOT included for book citations.

  2. In-text citations from works with three or more authors is shortened from the first time mentioned to (Hernandez et al., 2020)

  3. Include up to 20 authors in the reference.

  4. DOIs need to be formatted as clickable URLs such as https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1400256   

  5. Don’t include “Retrieved from” in front of a URL unless a retrieval date is needed.

  6. For website citation include the website name, unless it is the same as the author.

  7. Clear guidelines for citing media contributors that are not authors or editors.

Media type

     Include as author

 Film 

 Director 

TV series

Executive Producers

 Podcast 

Host or Executive Producer

Webinar 

Instructor 

Online Streaming Video

Person/Group who uploaded the video

  1. Citation examples are provided for different types of online sources including: podcasts, youtube videos, and social media posts.  

  2. Use the singular “they” as a gender neutral pronoun instead of he or she.

  3. Clear format guidelines are provided for student and professional research papers.

  4. More flexibility in font choices/size and include:

    1. Calibri 11

    2. Arial 11

    3. Lucida Sans Unicode 10

    4. Times New Roman 12

    5. Georgia 11

  5. The running head on the title page no longer includes the words Running head. It now only includes the title of the paper and the page number.

  6. Student papers do not need to include a running head. (Unless specified from your instructor)

  7. At the end of a sentence, use one space instead of two.

What is an Annotated Bibliography

An annotated bibliography is a list of sources (books, articles, websites, etc.) with short paragraph about each source. An annotated bibliography is sometimes a useful step before drafting a research paper, or it can stand alone as an overview of the research available on a topic.

Each source in the annotated bibliography has a citation - the information a reader needs to find the original source, in a consistent format to make that easier. These consistent formats are called citation styles.  The most common citation styles are MLA (Modern Language Association) for humanities, and APA (American Psychological Association) for social sciences.

Annotations are about 4 to 6 sentences long (roughly 150 words), and address:

  •     Main focus or purpose of the work
  •     Usefulness or relevance to your research topic 
  •     Special features of the work that were unique or helpful
  •     Background and credibility of the author
  •     Conclusions or observations reached by the author
  •     Conclusions or observations reached by you


Annotations versus Abstracts

Many scholarly articles start with an abstract, which is the author's summary of the article to help you decide whether you should read the entire article.  This abstract is not the same thing as an annotation.  The annotation needs to be in your own words, to explain the relevance of the source to your particular assignment or research question.

Annotated Bibliography video

Avoiding Plagiarism

What is Plagiarism?

To plagiarize means to:

  • Steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own;
  • Use (another's production) without crediting the source;
  • Commit literary theft;
  • Present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.

(Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary definition of "plagiarize," retrieved June 20, 2005)

CSUN Policy on Plagiarism

. . .Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an academic program at a campus is listed in Section 41301, Title 5, California Code of Regulations, as an offense for which a student may be expelled, suspended, or given a less severe disciplinary sanction. . . .
(California State University Northridge Undergraduate/Graduate Catalog, 2006-2008 (PDF; requires Adobe Reader), p. 535)

Plagiarism: Intentionally or knowingly representing the words, ideas, or work of another as one's own in any academic exercise. Comments:

  1. Direct Quotation: Every direct quotation must be identified by quotation marks, or by appropriate indentation or by other means of identification, and must be promptly cited in a citation. Proper citation style for any academic department is outlined by the MLA Style Sheet or K. L. Turabian's A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses and Dissertations. These and similar publications are available in the Matador Bookstore and at the reference desk of the University Library. [See also: Citing Your Sources ]
  2. Paraphrase: Prompt acknowledgment is required when material from another source is paraphrased or summarized in whole or in part in your own words. To acknowledge a paraphrase properly, one might state: "to paraphrase Locke's comment . . ." and conclude with a citation identifying the exact reference. A citation acknowledging only a directly quoted statement does not suffice to notify the reader of any preceding or succeeding paraphrased material.
  3. Borrowed Facts or Information: Information obtained in one's reading or research which is not common knowledge among students in the course must be acknowledged. Examples of common knowledge might include the names of leaders of prominent nations, basic scientific laws, etc. Materials which contribute only to one's general understanding of the subject may be acknowledged in the bibliography and need not be immediately cited. One citation is usually sufficient to acknowledge indebtedness when a number of connected sentences in the paper draw their special information from one source. When direct quotations are used, however, quotation marks must be inserted and prompt acknowledgment is required.

Adapted from: California State University, Northridge Undergraduate/ Graduate Catalog, 2004-2006, p. 531-2 (Retrieved June 20, 2005)

Learn More About Plagiarism

Citation Formatting Tools

Citation managers are software that keep track of your sources and automatically format your citations in a variety of styles.

  • EndNote Web - free to CSUN students, staff, and faculty; integrates with MS Word and any browser; can export references directly from many databases
  • Help with EndNote Web
  • Zotero - free to anyone; integrates with MS Word and/or Google Docs; must be installed on your own computer 

Citing Your Sources

EndNote Tutorial for Windows

EndNote Tutorial for Macintosh

EndNote Tutorials